Tag Archives: social computing

Can we do it in the dark?

pool_picLet’s face it, some things are just better in the dark (or at least dim lighting), and while at the gym last week that became all too clear.  I’ve been recovering from an injury so the pool has been my best friend. When I arrived at the gym I found that it was closed for its spring cleaning. It was night and all the lights were off outside, but I saw the jacuzzi was still open and available. This turned out to be one of the most relaxing experiences I’ve had in quite some time. There were a couple of other people in the jacuzzi with me, but since it was dark, I didn’t really eve notice them. I was able to enjoy my solitude even with others around me.

When I think about this, it relates quite a bit to how many of use live our lives these days with many of our social interactions losing their face to face quality as we move through life watching others on Facebook and Twitter. We know those people are there, we can see them, but we don’t have to look them in the eye. We have the ability to live in our own little world where we can interact, ignore, like and dislike without every leaving the safety of our quite secluded darkness.

So I returned to the gym this week intent to have my relaxing solitude experience once again only to face a stark reality. The pool wasn’t closed for spring cleaning anymore and all the lights were on. I got into the jacuzzi and found myself in a circle of people I did not know with all of us simply staring at each other. No one spoke and it brought me right back to what I had been thinking about our lack of real human interaction. Eventually my old non-digital ways resurfaced from somewhere deep inside my subconscious and I struck up a conversation with another woman in the jacuzzi. Turned out our kids had gone to the same pre-school and we knew a number of the same people. We ended our conversation with plans to have coffee next week.

Just goes to show that sometimes shining a little light on things can change your whole perspective.

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I Know What You Did Yesterday

i-know-what-you-did-last-summerWhen I Know What You Did Last Summer came out it gave pause to many a teenager (and gown up) that had ever done something wrong (of course not to the extent of the characters in the movie, but still). The idea that someone may know what you’ve done and be able to track you down can be a chilling idea, but for marketers it is the holy grail. I’ve talked about the idea of targeting people when and where they are, especially as it relates to how I want to be targeted, on my terms. I’ve always loved the idea of being able to walk into a store and get a text message saying, “hey we see you are looking at those new shoes, how about we offer you 20% off if you buy those size 7s right now.” I remember working on similar initiatives back in the 90’s with context sensitive selling, which has now become marketplace, but it’s still pretty generic, but that’s all starting to change.

With augmented reality becoming more commonplace and companies focusing on distilling unstructured, big data, down to things marketers can use, my hopes aren’t too far out there. And now I’m looking at companies like PlaceIQ that are taking all that unstructured data about people and what they are doing and turning it into info that marketers can use to determine the best way to target people and market products. And now we are seeing companies like Apple realizing how to get into this game. With their purchase of WifiSlam, Apple is betting that they will be able to work with big data companies to be able to track people inside stores and venues and sell to them on the spot.

As we go further and further into this brave new world, we will really realize that marketers will always know what we did yesterday, today and even the possibility of our plans for tomorrow.

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A Floating “Tech” Incubator – Only In Silicon Valley

incubatorHow far would you go to bring your talent, or idea to Silicon Valley? Apparently for those non-citizens, the answer can be as close as 12 miles away. Blueseed, whose idea has to go under the category of “Only in Silicon Valley”, seems to think they have the solution for those H1 Visa workers – an incubator just of the coast of San Francisco—on a boat. But this is no ordinary boat, more like a floating (non-military community).

Blueseed’s website states: “The location will allow startup entrepreneurs from anywhere in the world to start or grow their company near Silicon Valley, without the need for a U.S. work visa.”

I have to say, I have been watching the incubator trend making a comeback, but I didn’t see this one coming. It is an interesting concept and once again shows the powerful pull of Silicon Valley. So for those of us lucky enough to live and work here (on actual land), let’s take a collective breath and be grateful for what we have…but keep an eye on what’s cooking just off the coast.

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Read about it yourself. Check out their website:

http://blueseed.co/

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Patient Safety: Going Well Beyond a Checklist

With National Patient Safety Awareness Week coming to a close, we thought we would give some attention to this important topic.

In following this week’s articles, blog posts and tweets, much of the discussion about patient safety has centered on the treatment a patient receives during a procedure or hospital stay, so we asked Dr. Gary Ferguson, one of TIBCO’s Chief Healthcare Strategists, for his perspective. In his words he feels strongly that: “Many of these approaches are treating the symptoms, and not the cause.”

This is a good point. Take for example the case of hospital readmissions. It’s well known that CMS will begin penalizing hospitals if their readmission rate exceeds standards.

So what should caregivers be focused on in order to achieve patient safety, and how does technology fit into the overall goals?

Continue reading

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